Tag Archives: hope

Ten Junes

30 May

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June is almost here and I’ve begun to feel it—that sense of giddy anticipation for the coming summer. All the signs are here—the misty fog banks that hug the coast, the scent of jasmine in the air when I open the front door; the ruffled towers of purple delphinium that sway in the offshore breezes that slip in off the Pacific.

Since I was a girl I’ve associated June with happy affairs—a long vacation from school, the prospect of lazy days spent at the beach, a new part time job—the thrill of a budding summer romance. June was always filled with a sense of endless possibility and hope.

Then in 2007, June turned on me. It became the month my daughter, Isa was diagnosed with leukemia.

Exactly ten years have passed since Isa’s diagnosis of cancer, when the perfect month of June lost its allure and became a time associated with doctors, nurses and hospitals; with antibiotic cocktails, blood transfusions and chemotherapy. When June became a time saturated with anxiety as my two year-old developed an angry rash all over her body and suddenly stopped eating because her mouth was filled with painful sores. June was raging fevers, sweat-soaked hospital sheets and sleepless nights. June was spending our twentieth wedding anniversary in an isolated hospital room watching our daughter suffer. June was thinking Isa could die.

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Isa  in the hospital on her third birthday.

But June turned out to be other things, as well. It was the wisdom of the doctors and the compassion of the nurses who held our hands, loved our daughter and reassured us that Isa would be all right. It was when our family, friends and community gave us their unconditional support through selfless acts of kindness—big and small. June was when we received that phone call from the doctor telling us that Isa had responded rapidly to the chemotherapy and was in remission.

Ten years.

In a few weeks, Isa will graduate from sixth grade. Like the jasmine that grows outside my front door, Isa has blossomed into a beautiful young girl—outgoing, smart, funny and most importantly, kind. Today she is considered cured and shows no residual effects from the chemotherapy.

As I stand on my front porch and look out at my garden, I realize the anxiety I carried for so long is gone. I am no longer afraid. Isa is still here with us and for this I am forever grateful. As summer stretches out before me, I feel only wonder for the possibility of what is to come.

June has come back to me.

 

Isa in a commercial for Santa Barbara Cottage Children’s Hospital

 

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Love Always Wins

19 Jun

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It’s been a rough week for our country. There’s been so much violence and hate lately. Yet after spending time in the garden this afternoon, I feel a great sense of hope as I focus on the diverse beauty around me.

While I’ve been horrified at what occurred in Orlando, I’m in awe of the outpouring of love from all over the world. It’s evident that love is so much more powerful than hate.

We are a remarkable nation of color and we are all equally vibrant!

It’s going to be okay. Love always wins, no matter what.

God Bless America.

Hope

5 Jun

june 5 flowers 8It’s the last day of school for my daughter, Isa and that means summer is officially here. Even with the drought here in Santa Barbara, the flowers are spectacular this year.

Every day when I walk out the front door I’m greeted by a glorious blanket of color that wraps me up in joy even when my heart is heavy. There’s been so much sadness in our community since the shootings that took place in Isla Vista on May 23. There is still so much healing that needs to take place.

Despite this tragedy, I still believe that beauty always finds its way into our lives and somehow continues to blossom even when the conditions are unfavorable.

I choose to believe in the goodness of all people. I pray  for change. I watch for growth. And I hope for love.

And it’s all right there in the garden to remind me every single day.

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Here I Go Again

13 Sep
The peaceful surroundings at Camp Reach for the Stars in Ojai, CA

The peaceful surroundings at Camp Reach for the Stars in Ojai, CA

I never expected to see Alice* again. Our family had met her over five years ago when our daughter Isa was first diagnosed with leukemia at the age of two and a half.

Shortly after Isa’s diagnosis we were invited to attend the American Cancer Society’s Camp Reach for the Stars—a weekend long outdoor camp for families who have a child with cancer or a child who has survived cancer. It’s an opportunity to relax and have fun with other families who have walked in your shoes; who know exactly what you’re going through and because of their experiences, can offer you hope that your child will make it through treatment and be well enough to come back the following year. Camp Reach for the Stars is where we first met Alice over six years ago.

Isa after getting her face painted

Isa after getting her face painted

The weekend camp experience is full of fun activities—swimming, hiking, zip-lining, arts and crafts, movie night and a talent show. Every child is assigned their own personal counselor so the parents can relax by themselves, have a massage, or just lounge by the pool. Three times a day when the bell rings, we all hike up the hill to the dining hall and enjoy delicious home-cooked food and great company. Over the years, we’ve all become one big family. Since we began attending camp six years ago, Alice has always been a vital presence at camp—her goofy sense of humor and loving spirit always managed put a smile on our faces no matter how discouraged we felt.

Leah and Camp Director Amanda

Leah and Camp Director Amanda

But last year, at the end of camp when everyone gathered around the fire pit for the closing ceremonies, Alice’s mother, choked up from the tears she could no longer hold back, told us that this would most likely be the last time they would be bringing their daughter to camp. A few days earlier they had found out that Alice’s cancer had relapsed for the fourth time since she was first diagnosed at the age of nine. There was little hope that any kind of treatment would get rid of the insidious tumor that had wrapped itself around her heart. Our entire family was devastated by this news. All I could think was that I couldn’t bear the thought of coming back to camp without Alice being there.

The thing is, once your kid gets diagnosed with cancer, whether you want it or not, cancer becomes a huge part of your life. It’s like receiving a lifetime membership to the cancer club. You end up meeting and becoming friends with many families who have had to deal with a child battling cancer. This can be excruciating at times because sometimes these children whom you meet and end up loving die from their cancer. You realize you have to do everything in your power to help find a cure so that more of these children don’t die.

Isa and Nora performing in the talent show

Isa and Nora performing in the talent show

So here I go again. It’s September, which means it is PEDIATRIC CANCER AWARENESS month and it’s time for me to talk about pediatric cancer again. Oh no—not again, you say. Isn’t she tired of writing about cancer yet?

Well to be honest, the answer is YES. Yes, I am tired of writing about cancer. In fact, I’d prefer to not write about it at all. I’d prefer not to hear about children who are newly diagnosed. I’d prefer not to see photographs posted on Facebook memorializing children who are no longer alive because cancer has taken their lives. I’d prefer not to see the agonizing fear in the face of another parent who is terrified about what’s going to happen to their child.

I’d prefer that pediatric cancer be wiped off the face of the earth.

But since that’s not about to happen anytime soon, I figure it’s best to keep talking about it and writing about it as much as possible with the idea in mind that perhaps someone reading this will begin to realize that more and more children are diagnosed with pediatric cancer every day, and that one day it might just be them or someone close to them who is directly affected by this disease. And maybe—just maybe, this awareness will prompt them to act in some small way to make a change—whether it be raising money for research, helping out a family in need, or simply just having a conversation about pediatric cancer from time to time. I truly believe that simply talking about something important can incite change, even in a very small way.

Last weekend, our family attended our sixth Camp Reach for the Stars. Our two oldest daughters, Nora and Leah volunteered as counselors for the camp. We had a marvelous time hanging out with everyone, laughing; eating, joking—especially with Alice. Yes—Alice was there. She was back at camp in all her glory, with no sign of cancer in her body whatsoever. The radiation zapped that tumor into smithereens and now it’s nothing more than a hazy image on an MRI filed away in some doctor’s office.

So let’s keep the conversation going. Let’s work to find a cure. It’s true that children do die from cancer, but this time, whether you believe it a miracle occurred or not, one child did not die.

There is always hope.

See you next year, Alice!

*I’ve changed her name to protect her privacy

Wordless Wednesday: Puppy Bliss

14 Mar

Many of my fellow bloggers publish a “Wordless Wednesday” and since life has been so chaotic lately and I haven’t found time to write, I thought I’d post some photos that you might enjoy.

And who would have thought that a litter of Dalmatian puppies would help dump me out of the bucket of sadness I’ve been wallowing in for the past month? Yet, in the simple act of holding those wriggling, still-spotless puppies to my chest, I’ve felt the return of joy and hope seep back into my heart.

It feels good.

A Different Outcome

21 Feb

It’s difficult to believe that an entire year has passed since Lexi Krasnoff died from her leukemia. I’m re-posting this in honor of her precious memory. She will never be forgotten.

Lexi Krasnoff died on a Friday afternoon at four thirty. It had been a glorious Santa Barbara day—the kind of day when we forget that we’re still in the middle of February. A soft breeze drifted through the newly budding trees and pointed its finger in the direction of spring. It was the kind of day when the air was scented with a hit of early blooming flowers, offering a sense of anticipation and hope for what was ahead. It was not a day when a beautiful and precious three year-old girl should have died.

But there’s never a day when it’s tolerable for a child to die.

When I told my seven year-old daughter that her little friend, Lexi had died, she didn’t believe me at first.

“Isa,” I told her, pulling her onto my lap. “I’m so very sorry to have to tell you that Lexi died this afternoon.”

She stared at me with a half smile on her face. “No she didn’t, Mommy—you’re just kidding around with me!”

My eyes filled as I choked out the words. “No, Honey—I’m not joking. Lexi died a few hours ago. I’m so sorry, sweetie.” I cradled my daughter’s warm body to mine and cried into her sweet-smelling neck.

She pulled away from me. She still didn’t believe me. “Mommy, Lexi didn’t die! That’s not funny!”

I took her by her shoulders and looked into her face. My voice cracked.

“Isa—I’m sorry, but it’s really true. Lexi was very sick and her little body couldn’t fight the leukemia anymore and she died a little while ago at the hospital.”

She saw the tears on my cheeks and finally realized I was telling her the truth. And then she began to sob. I’d never seen Isa this upset before. She cried uncontrollably for almost an hour and there was nothing I could to do to console my daughter. Her friend was gone.

Lexi and Isa three weeks before she died.

What I admire most about Lexi’s mother, Kat is that she never gave up hope that Lexi would make it. She spent day after day in a hospital room waiting for her daughter to get well again. When Lexi was moved to the pediatric intensive care unit, she became a mother lion who would not stand for tears or sad faces from visitors because that meant they did not have hope.  As she watched and waited while the leukemia ravaged her daughter’s little body, I know she held onto that hope until the very last moment.

Since I learned of Lexi’s death, a sensation of pressure has been building in my chest like a vice has been carefully positioned on either side of my lungs. It squeezes a little tighter every day, making it more difficult to take a deep breath. I thought my bouts of tears would help loosen the tightness in my chest, but it’s not going away. It sits there—rock hard and unbreakable, making my heart feel heavy and my body fatigued.

At first I thought it was only the grief and sadness over losing Lexi that was filling up my chest and clouding my thoughts with despair.  After all, Lexi was an extraordinary little girl who charmed me and everyone else around her with her sweet smile and sassy personality. She was special, and it wasn’t just because she had cancer—from what I’ve heard from her family and friends, she was born that way. I feel a deep sadness about her death that weighs heavily on me, but it’s more than that—the pain I feel is mixed with an emotion which burdens me in a more profound sense: I feel guilty.

Isa at Lexi’s memorial.

I feel guilty because by some luck of the draw, my daughter lived, and Kat’s daughter did not. Although I’m filled with an unending gratitude that Isa is still here with us, I’ve become fully aware of the unfairness of Lexi’s death. I also know that what I’m experiencing is “survivor’s guilt” and that it’s a common emotion for parents of children who survive their cancer.

Isa’s oncologist warned me about this condition four years ago after a little boy named Jeffrey died of the exact type of leukemia that killed Lexi. We had befriended Jeffrey and his family in the hospital when Isa was first diagnosed, and our families developed a bond that only families with children suffering cancer can form. When Jeffrey relapsed and died, it was a crushing blow to our entire family. The intense fear that I felt about Jeffrey’s death caused my panic level to rise to a fever pitch because it made the possibility of Isa’s death that much more real. If it happened to Jeffrey, it could happen to Isa.

I remember feeling guilty that Isa was doing relatively well during her illness, but because I was in the throes of her treatment and so terrified of losing her, I set aside those feelings of guilt and placed my complete focus on taking care of my daughter. For my own psychological survival, I had to shut myself down. At that time, I didn’t think about how unfair Jeffrey’s death was. I convinced myself that there was some predetermined reason for our friends to lose their only son to this horrible disease, and that someday we would all realize the good that came from it. I shoved all of those intense feelings of guilt and loss into a hidden chamber in my heart and left them there, unresolved and festering like bacteria growing in a Petri dish.

So here I am again, in the same place I was after Jeffrey’s death, but the difference is that now Isa is healthy, and I’m strong enough to face the pain and the guilt about Lexi’s death. This is why I’m walking around in a daze and can’t snap out of it. This is why my heart hurts so much. I finally understand the unfairness of it all and I feel the pain to the core of my being. I wish there was something—anything—that I could do to take Kat’s suffering away, but I know that no matter what I say or do, it will never be enough.

Caleb, Jonathan, Kat and Lexi Krasnoff

What I hold close in my heart is the knowledge that Lexi brought so much love into this world during her short life. I saw how much the doctors and nurses at the hospital loved having her as their patient. I witnessed it at her memorial service when her father spoke about how Lexi was his best friend. I listened when her grandfather talked about how Lexi taught him what pure love was. I cried when one of Lexi’s neighborhood friends got up in front of all those people in the church and sang a song dedicated to her. Finally, I watched as hundreds of people let go of pink balloons into the clouds above, on each one a personal message written to this sweet little girl who died too soon. Lexi, just by being who she was, had managed to change them forever.

Messages sent to Lexi

But I also realize that it’s not fair that the world doesn’t get to watch this adorable little girl with the big brown eyes and pouty lips grow up into a sparkling young woman full of life. It’s not fair that my daughter lost her little friend to cancer. It’s not fair that Lexi’s little brother Caleb will never know his big sister.  It’s not fair that I get to watch Isa grow and learn and play and dance and laugh and go to college and get married and have children and Lexi’s parents do not get to watch their daughter do these same things. I’m sad and sick and angry about this. Why do I get it all and they don’t?

Pam, the nurse (and close friend) who has helped take care of Isa these past four years helped put things into perspective for me. She told me that it’s normal to feel guilty when your child survives cancer when other children die. She said that my experience dealing with Isa’s cancer is every bit as painful and life-changing as that of a parent whose child has died from this insidious disease.

“In your mind’s eye,” Pam told me, “you probably watched Isa die and may have may have even planned her funeral—every parent who has a child with a life-threatening illness goes to that dark place, so your pain is just as weighty as anyone else’s. From what you’ve been through, you know intimately how that pain feels. It’s just that you had a different outcome.”

Yes, my outcome was different—I was one of the lucky ones.  And I’m sure the guilt will stay with me, but it’s imperative that I feel it and deal with it and not run away from it. It’s important for me to use my experiences to help others should they need it. I know that it’s my responsibility to offer my love and support to those families who will benefit from hearing my story, because I was one of the ones who had a different outcome.

No matter what happens, every parent who has a child with cancer needs to know that Isa made it, because then they can have the hope that their own child will survive. Hope is really the essence of life, and the one thing we all can hang onto. Hope is what kept Kat going until Lexi took her last breath.

And yes, it’s true that sometimes children die from their cancer.

But sometimes, they don’t.